Friday, May 31, 2013

Rebels With A Cause





To tell the story of the U.S. Founding, the University Honors Program presents a non-partisan exhibit illuminating historic events that occurred between 1774 and 1788, during the founding of the United States of America. The key storytellers are thirty 18th Century rare documents, manuscripts, and letters on loan from private collections throughout the United States.


Dr. Naomi Yavneh Klos, July 3rd, 2013, interview on the set of CBS Morning News

The exhibit is free and open to the public from Flag Day, June 14th, 2013 until August 2, 2013, the day prescribed by the Continental Congress for Delegates signed the engrossed Declaration of Independence. The exhibit can be viewed from 9am until 7pm at the Loyola University Honors Suite at the Monroe Library in New Orleans.





1776 Journals of Congress,  by John Dunlap, July 2, 1776 entry 



The exhibit features 18th-Century primary sources reporting on seven June and July events:




Dr. Naomi Yavneh Klos, July 3rd, 2013, on the set of CBS Morning News presenting Rebels With A Cause



The Resolution for Independency and Declaration of Independence - July 2nd, 1776 - August 2, 1776.




  • John Dunlap’s official printing of the 1776 Journals of Congress opened to the July 2nd Resolution for Independency and the July 4th, 1776 Declaration of Independence. 
  • Dunlap facsimile printing of the Declaration of Independence  that was featured by the Freedom Train on its nationwide tour from April 1975 - December 1976 and was seen in 76 cities in the 48 contiguous states during the Bi-Centennial celebration. 
  • The Pennsylvania Packet, July 8, 1776, Centennial Edition, with the entire text of the Declaration of Independence printed on page one.
  • Various Signed letters and documents from numerous signers of the Declaration of Independence including John Hancock and Thomas Jefferson. 





The Establishment of Flag Day - June 14th, 1777 

  • John Dunlap’s official printing of the 1777 Journals of Congress opened to the June 14, 1777 Resolution establishing the first flag of the United States. 
  • Acts Passed at the First and Second Sessions of the Fifteenth Congress opened to the Act to establish the Flag of the United States that changed the flag to 20 stars, with a new star to be added when each new state was admitted, while the number of stripes was reduced to 13 to honor the original states, April 4, 1818 
  • 13 Star Flag sewn for the Centennial International Exhibition of 1876, the first official World's Fair in the United States held in Philadelphia. 




Spain Declares War on Great Britain, creating a de facto Revolutionary War alliance with the United States by launching attacks from Louisiana - June 21st, 1779. 

  • 1763 printing of the Definitive Treaty of Friendship of Peace between his Britannick Majesty, the Most Christian King, and the King of Spain, Concluded at Paris, the 10th day of Feb., 1763 that turned over Florida and eight Louisiana parishes to Great Britain. 
  • Autograph Letters signed by King George III and Queen Charlotte, who were the monarchs of British Colonial America. 
  • 1780 printing of Major General Campbell's account of the surrender of Baton Rouge and numerous Florida towns east up to Pensacola led by Governor, Don Beraud de Galvez. 
  • The 1803 Acts of Congress open to the dual language printing of the Louisiana Purchase Treaty signed Commissioners James Monroe and Robert Livingston. 
  • Louisiana Territory William C.C. Claiborne autograph document signed displayed with the new Governor's Address to the Citizens of Louisiana dated December 20, 1803. 






A United States President-elect declines the office: under the Articles of Confederation, Samuel Johnston was elected President of the United States in Congress Assembled and the following morning he declined to accept the office - July 9th - 10th, 1781 

  • 1781 Journals of the United States in Congress Assembled published by John Patterson and opened to Samuel Johnston’s presidency election, the entry on his declining the office, and the subsequent election of Thomas McKean as second President of the United States under the Articles of Confederation. 
  • Rare Henry Knox, Secretary of War document signed by Samuel Johnston as North Carolina’s first US Senator. 
  • President Thomas McKean September 29, 1781 letter to New Hampshire General John Stark regarding the dollar’s rampant depreciation and his military pay. 




Congress Flees Philadelphia - The United States in Congress Assembled, under threat of a US Army Mutiny, relocates the Seat of Government from Independence Hall to Nassau Hall in Princeton, New Jersey - June 21st, 1783, to July 3rd, 1783. 

  • Proclamation issued by Elias Boudinot, as President of the United States in Congress Assembled on June 24, 1783 explaining the necessity of abandoning Independence Hall, due to a US Army mutiny, and the necessity of relocating the US Seat of Government to Nassau Hall in Princeton New Jersey. 
  • President Elias Boudinot autograph letter signed to Major General Arthur St. Clair stating that You may depend on Congress having been perfectly satisfied with your conduct acknowledging his role in extracting Congress from Independence Hall while it was surrounded by over 300 mutinous soldiers. 
  • An 18th Century printing of an Annis Boudinot’s Poem, the wife of NJ Signer Richard Stockton and sister of President Elias Boudinot, who was instrumental in her brother’s decision to move the US Seat of Government to Princeton. 





The Northwest Ordinance - An Ordinance for the government of the Territory of the United States northwest of the River Ohio - July 13th, 1787 

  • August 1787 full printing of the Ordinance for the government of the Territory of the United States northwest of the River Ohio
  • In accordance with Article V of the Northwest Ordinance, exhibited is the Ohio Enabling Act of 1802 entitled: An Act To Enable The People Of The Eastern Division Of The Territory North-West Of The River Ohio, To Form A Constitution And State Government, And For The Admission Of Such State Into The Union, On An Equal Footing With The Original States, And For Other Purposes
  • In accordance with Article VI of the Northwest Ordinance, exhibited is a Deed of Emancipation autograph document signed by David Enlow freeing his slave Sarah on September 20, 1807 meeting the no slavery requirement in the new Territory of Indiana. 




The Ratification of the Constitution of 1787 - June 21st, 1788 

  • October 1787 printing of the United States Constitution framed in Philadelphia by the delegates of 12 States on September 17, 1787.
  • July 3, 1788 Newspaper account of the Portsmouth Parade celebrating 9th State, New Hampshire, ratification dissolving the Articles of Confederation and enacting the Constitution of 1787 along with a the state’s Bill of Rights recommendations. 
  • August 1788 Pamphlet printing an Eleven State Ratification table printed with ratification resolutions of New Jersey, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia and New York. Also printed are numerous State amendments to the US Constitution of 1787, including New York’s 32 Amendments and Virginia’s Declaration of Rights with its 21 proposed Amendments. 





By: Stanley Yavneh Klos
Edited By: Naomi Yavneh Klos, Ph.D.

  • First United American Republic: United Colonies of North America: 13 British Colonies United in Congress was founded by 12 colonies on September 5th, 1774 (Georgia joined in 1775)  and governed through a British Colonial Continental Congress.  Peyton Randolph and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief;
  • Second United American Republic: The United States of America: 13 Independent States United in Congress was founded by 12 states on July 2nd, 1776 (New York abstained until July 8th), and governed through the United States Continental CongressJohn Hancock and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief; 
  • Third United American Republic: The United States of America: A Perpetual Union was founded by 13 States on March 1st, 1781, with the enactment of the first U.S. Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, and governed through the United States in Congress Assembled.  Samuel Huntington and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief; 
  • Fourth United American Republic: The United States of America: We the People  was formed by 11 states on March 4th, 1789 (North Carolina and Rhode Island joined in November 1789 and May 1790, respectively), with the enactment of the U.S. Constitution of 1787. The fourth and current United States Republic governs through  the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate in Congress Assembled, the U.S. President and Commander-in-Chief, and the U.S. Supreme Court.  George Washington served as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief.


Capitals of the United States and Colonies of America

Philadelphia
Sept. 5, 1774 to Oct. 24, 1774
Philadelphia
May 10, 1775 to Dec. 12, 1776
Baltimore
Dec. 20, 1776 to Feb. 27, 1777
Philadelphia
March 4, 1777 to Sept. 18, 1777
Lancaster
September 27, 1777
York
Sept. 30, 1777 to June 27, 1778
Philadelphia
July 2, 1778 to June 21, 1783
Princeton
June 30, 1783 to Nov. 4, 1783
Annapolis
Nov. 26, 1783 to Aug. 19, 1784
Trenton
Nov. 1, 1784 to Dec. 24, 1784
New York City
Jan. 11, 1785 to Nov. 13, 1788
New York City
Nov. 1788 to March 3,1789
New York City
March 3,1789 to August 12, 1790
Philadelphia
December 6,1790 to May 14, 1800
Washington DC
November 17,1800 to Present


The exhibit is free and open to the public from Flag Day, June 14th, 2013 until August 2, 2013, the day prescribed by the Continental Congress for Delegates signed the engrossed Declaration of Independence. The exhibit can be viewed from 9am until 7pm at the Loyola University Honors Suite at the Monroe Library in New Orleans.







Stan Klos lecturing at the Republican National Convention's PoliticalFest 2000 Rebels With A Vision Exhibit  in Philadelphia's Convention Hall 

Primary Source exhibits are available for display in your community. The costs range from $1,000 to $25,000 depending on length of time on loan and the rarity of artifacts chosen. 



Historic.us

Dr. Naomi Yavneh Klos hosting the Louisiana Primary Source Exhibit at the State Capitol Building for the 2012 Bicentennial Celebration.






Book a primary source exhibit and a professional speaker for your next event by contacting Historic.us today. Our Clients include many Fortune 500 companies, associations, non-profits, colleges, universities, national conventions, pr and advertising agencies. As the leading exhibitor of primary sources, many of our clients have benefited from our historic displays that are designed to entertain and educate your target audience. Contact us to learn how you can join our "roster" of satisfied clientele today!



Historic.us

 
A Non-profit Corporation



Primary Source Exhibits


727-771-1776 | Exhibit Inquiries

202-239-1774 | Office

202-239-0037 | Fax

Dr. Naomi and Stanley Yavneh Klos, Principals

Naomi@Historic.us
Stan@Historic.us

Primary Source exhibits are available for display in your community. The costs range from $1,000 to $35,000 depending on length of time on loan and the rarity of artifacts chosen. 

Website: www.Historic.us





The Forgotten First Amendment - Please Ratify Now!
For more information go to Article the First